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CORONAVIRUS - 09.06.20

Link to coronavirus guidance in different languages: https://www.doctorsoftheworld.org.uk/coronavirus-information/ 

Patient guidance on self isolation and social distancing for Covid 19 - please follow link:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/

Symptoms and what to do:

Self isolate if you have either:

  • a high temperature – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature)
  • a new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual)
  • notice a change to or have a loss of smell
  • notice a change to or have a loss of taste

If anyone in your household has these symptoms, you must self isolate for 14 days.

To protect others, do not go to places like a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital. Stay at home, stay alert.

Use the 111 online coronavirus service to find out what to do.

Only call 111 if you cannot get help online.

X-Ray

doctor examining an x-rayAn X-ray is a widely used diagnostic test to examine the inside of the body. X-rays are a very effective way of detecting problems with bones, such as fractures. They can also often identify problems with soft tissue, such as pneumonia or breast cancer.

If you have a X-ray, you will be asked to lie on a table or stand against a surface so that the part of your body being X-rayed is between the X-ray tube and the photographic plate.

An X-ray is usually carried out by a radiographer, a healthcare professional who specialises in using imaging technology, such as X-rays and ultrasound scanners.

It is your responsibility to contact the surgery for results of your x-ray, scan or ultrasound. The surgery will contact you if the result requires further action. This may be by letter or a phone call, asking you to make an appointment or telephone consultation.

You can find out more about x-ray tests, how they are performed, their function and the risks by visiting the NHS Choices website.

 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website